Courses on Turkish Studies and Languages

AAST BC3610 Persian Literature through English Translation

Call number: 05861

MW 1140am-12:55pm

Hossein Kamaly

Students are introduced to the multiplicity of geographical and historical centers of literary activity: courts in tenth-century Central Asia and seventeenth century India; The songs of whirling dervishes who followed the teachings of Rumi in Turkey to Sufi hospices in fourteenth century Kashmir; Itinerant storytellers in Afghanistan, the Caucasus, and Bosnia. The interrelationships between literature, patronage, religion, and language policy are discussed, and the evolving connection between Iran and the Persian language is emphasized. The voice of women in Persian literature is given particular attention: including 17th century women of the Mughal court in India and Parvin EÊ¿teá¹£Ä mÄ« and Forugh Farrokhzad in 20th century Iran. More recent women poets and fiction-writers will be introduced. No familiarity with Persian language or the history of its development is assumed.   

INTERMEDIATE MODERN TURKISH I

Fall 2016

As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 2901. A continuation of the study of the written and spoken language of Turkey, with readings of literary, historical, and other texts. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

ELEMENTARY MODERN TURKISH I

Fall 2016
As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 1901.  An introduction to the written and spoken language of Turkey. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

ADVANCED TURKISH I

Fall 2016 and Spring 2017

Advanced Turkish I is designed to use authentic Turkish materials around projects that are chosen by the student in a research seminar format where students conduct their own research and share it in class in a friendly atmosphere. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

ELEMENTARY OTTOMAN TURKISH

Fall 2016, and Spring 2017

Prerequisites: two years of modern Turkish. Elementary Ottoman Turkish aims to focus on reading selected authentic print materials that are enjoyable and interesting, such as authentic detective novels, historical documents, and literary materials. The class materials are designed according to the interests of students in a fast-paced learning environment. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

INTERMEDIATE MODERN TURKISH I

Fall 2016 and Spring 2017

As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 2901. A continuation of the study of the written and spoken language of Turkey, with readings of literary, historical, and other texts. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

ELEMENTARY MODERN TURKISH I

Fall 2016, and Spring 2017

As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 1901.  An introduction to the written and spoken language of Turkey. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

ELEMENTARY MODERN TURKISH I

Spring 2017

As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 1902.  An introduction to the written and spoken language of Turkey. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

READINGS IN OTTOMAN TEXTS I

Fall 2016 and Spring 2017

Prerequisites: Elementary Ottoman Turkish. Intermediate Otttoman deals with authentic Ottoman texts from the early 18th and 19th centuries. The class uses Turkish as the primary language for instruction, and students are expected to translate assigned texts into Turkish or English. A reading packet will include various authentic archival materials in rika, talik and divani styles. Whenever possible, students will be given texts that are related to their areas of interest. Various writing styles will be dealt with on Ottoman literature, history, and archival documents. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

BERL/ISTANBUL:MIGRATN,CLTR,VAL

Fall 2016

An intensive seminar analyzing questions of migration, identity, (self-) representation, and values with regard to the Turkish minority living in Germany today. Starting with a historical description of the „guest worker“ program that brought hundreds of thousands of Turkish nationals to Germany in the 1960s and 1970s, the course will focus on the experiences and cultural production of the second and third generations of Turkish Germans, whose presence has profoundly transformed German society and culture. Primary materials include diaries, autobiographies, legal and historical documents, but the course will also analyze poetry, novels, theater plays and films. In German.

THE BLACK SEA IN HISTORY

Fall 2016

We are used to thinking of history in national terms, or at least in reference to major civilizations (“Western civilization,” “Near Eastern civilization,” etc.). In “real life,” however, interactions among people, linguistic communities, and cultures frequently cut across political divisions. Water – rivers, streams, seas – is often an invitation to settlement, commerce, and conquest. This course offers a look (inspired in part by Fernand Braudel’s Mediterranean) at a body of water – the Black Sea – and the lands around it, in sweeping historical perspective. Focus is on those moments when the various civilizations and empires that originated and flourished around the Black Sea met and intersected in friendship or in enmity. We will look at ancient civilizations, Greek colonization, Byzantine-Slav interactions, the period of Ottoman dominance, Russian-Turkish rivalry, and decolonization and wars in the 19th and 20th centuries. We hope that we will be able to pay particular attention to questions of ecology, language, religion, and cultural interaction throughout.

DEMOCRACY IN THE MIDDLE EAST

Spring 2017

Prerequisites: application requirements: SEE UNDERGRAD SEMINAR SECTION OF DEPARTMENT’S WEBSITE. Where the establishment of sustainable democracies is concerned, the Middle East has perhaps the poorest record of all regions of the world since World War II. This is in spite of the fact that two of the first constitutions in the non-Western world were established in this region, in the Ottoman Empire in 1876 and in Iran in 1906. Notwithstanding these and other subsequent democratic and constitutional experiments, Middle Eastern countries have been ruled over the past century by some of the world’s last absolute monarchies, as well as a variety of other autocratic, military-dominated and dictatorial regimes. This course, intended primarily for advanced undergraduates, explores this paradox. It will examine the evolution of constitutional thought and practice, and how it was embodied in parliamentary and other democratic systems in the Middle East. It will examine not only the two Ottoman constitutional periods of 1876-78 and 1908-18, and that of Iran from 1905 onwards, but also the various precursors to these experiments, and some of their 20th century sequels in the Arab countries, Turkey and Iran. This will involve detailed study of the actual course of several Middle Eastern countries’ democratic experiments, of the obstacles they faced, and of their outcomes. Students are expected to take away a sense of the complexities of the problems faced by would-be Middle Eastern democrats and constitutionalists, and of some of the reasons why the Middle East has appeared to be an exception to a global trend towards democratization in the post-Cold War era.

BANKING IN BRAZIL:COMPARATIVE EXAMINATIO

Spring 2017

This course provides students the tools to analyze the workings and efficacy of emerging economies’ financial systems as a pillar for sustained economic development. We begin by studying the basic characteristics of six banking systems (Brazil, Mexico, India, China, Indonesia and Turkey) and then proceed to examine the efficacy of a chosen one (Brazil) vis-à-vis the others. Key aspects examined include the roles of public sector and foreign banks, bank credit availability and systemic resilience, and depth of domestic fixed income and equity markets.

NAT SECURITY STRAT OF MID EAST

Spring 2017

At the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East is home to many diverse peoples, with ancient and proud cultures, in varying stages of political and socio-economic development, often times in conflict. Now in a state of historic flux, the Arab Spring has transformed the Middle Eastern landscape, with great consequence for the national security strategies of the countries of the region and their foreign relations. The primary source of the world’s energy resources, the Middle East remains the locus of the terror-WMD-fundamentalist nexus, which continues to pose a significant threat to both regional and international security. The course surveys the national security challenges facing the region’s primary players (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinians and Turkey, Jordan) and how the revolutions of the past year will affect them. Unlike many Middle East courses, which focus on US policy in the region, the course concentrates on the regional players’ perceptions of the threats and opportunities they face and on the strategies they have adopted to deal with them. It thus provides an essential vantage point for all those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of a region, which stands at the center of many of the foreign policy issues of our era. The course is designed for those with a general interest in the Middle East, especially those interested in national security issues, students of comparative politics and future practitioners, with an interest in “real world” international relations and national security.